Babies and Eye Color

Babies and eye color banner

Eye color, is an interesting subject that most expecting parents like to guess and speculate what color their newborn child will have. As some find out the color they are born with never actually sticks with them and changes by the time they are 3 years old. Take a look at this video by host Craig Benzine of Mental Floss, a video series which answers some interesting questions about life.


An article by Medical Daily Pulse goes over eye color and explains more about melanin. Read below:
Newborns are not born with the levels of melanin that they'll eventually have. The change in eye color usually happens around six months, but eyes can change color up to about 3 years old. This increases over time, which is why often eyes that start out blue may change to another color.
The eyes contain melanocytes, which are cells that produce melanin — a type of pigment that can also affect the color of your skin and hair — in the eyes. A small deposit of melanin in the irises, muscular rings around the pupils, makes them appear blue, while a medium amount makes them green or hazel, and a lot of it makes the irises brown.
A good way to tell if a baby's eye will change is by looking at the eye from the side, so there's no light affecting your view. If there are hints of gold in the iris, the eyes will probably become brown or green over time. If the eyes are still very blue, they'll probably stay that way. However, this needs to be properly studied.


For more on this article by Medical Daily Pulse click here.

Important Safety Information

The Visian ICL is intended for the correction of moderate to high nearsightedness. Visian ICL and Visian TICL surgery is intended to safely and effectively correct nearsightedness between -3.0 D to -15.0 D, the reduction in nearsightedness up to -20.0 D and treatment of astigmatism from 1.0 D to 4.0 D. If you have nearsightedness within these ranges, Visian ICL surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Because the Visian ICL corrects for distance vision, it does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, you may require them at some point, even if you have never worn them before.

Implantation of the Visian ICL is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. Please discuss the risks with your eye care professional. Complications, although rare, may include need for additional surgical procedures, inflammation, loss of cells from the back surface of the cornea, increase in eye pressure, and cataracts.

You should NOT have Visian ICL surgery if:

  • Your doctor determines that the shape of your eye is not an appropriate fit for the Visian ICL
  • You are pregnant or nursing
  • You do not meet the minimum endothelial cell density for your age at the time of implantation as determined by your eye doctor
  • Your vision is not stable as determined by your eye doctor

Before considering Visian ICL surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about Visian ICL surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks, and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery. For additional information with potential benefits, risks and complications please visit DiscoverICL.com

References

References

1Visian ICL Patient Information Booklet

2Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46.

3Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5Lee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

6Parkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

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