Drawing With Your Eyes

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A blink and a glance is all you need to make a robotic arm move and paint. Read below what eye technology advancements are allowing your eyes to paint a picture.

Article from The Daily Dot:

Dr. Aldo Faisal of Imperial College London’s Departments of Computing and Bioengineering successfully demonstrated a system that lets a human user control a paintbrush-wielding robot arm using only his or her eyes. He suggests this might lay the foundation for humanity’s future of robot-enabled multitasking. Using technology that tracks the user’s eyes, the robot is able to receive and understand a variety of commands, even to clean the paintbrush and prepare it with a different color. Once the robot is holding a paint-dabbed brush, it’s apparently pretty intuitive to use. Sabine Dziemian, a postgraduate in Faisal’s research group, says, “If I want to draw a straight line, I look at the start point and the end point, and the robot moves the brush across that line.”

Blinking three times puts the robot in color selection mode, in which it moves the brush over to a variety of pre-dispensed colors. At that point, the user only needs to look at the color he or she wants to use next, and the arm applies the color to the brush.

“Since time immemorial, human imagination has sparked the idea of having additional arms,” says Faisal. He invokes the multiarmed Hindu goddess Shiva, often a symbol of transformation, to suggest we might one day “do the dishes while taking a phone call or [holding] your baby and [preparing] the food at the same time, because you have just that extra pair of hands attached to you.”

The future of robotic prosthetics is developing rapidly. Last month, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories made significant progress in wiring a prosthetic device to the human brain, while leading manufacturer Ossur has developed a battery-powered knee that optimizes movements based on the wearer’s natural gait.

Taken as a whole, these developments could not only help make able-bodied humans more productive, but they also have immediately obvious potential for the disabled, who might use remotely controlled robotic arms to maintain more independence.

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Important Safety Information

The Visian ICL is intended for the correction of moderate to high nearsightedness. Visian ICL and Visian TICL surgery is intended to safely and effectively correct nearsightedness between -3.0 D to -15.0 D, the reduction in nearsightedness up to -20.0 D and treatment of astigmatism from 1.0 D to 4.0 D. If you have nearsightedness within these ranges, Visian ICL surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Because the Visian ICL corrects for distance vision, it does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, you may require them at some point, even if you have never worn them before.

Implantation of the Visian ICL is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. Please discuss the risks with your eye care professional. Complications, although rare, may include need for additional surgical procedures, inflammation, loss of cells from the back surface of the cornea, increase in eye pressure, and cataracts.

You should NOT have Visian ICL surgery if:

  • Your doctor determines that the shape of your eye is not an appropriate fit for the Visian ICL
  • You are pregnant or nursing
  • You do not meet the minimum endothelial cell density for your age at the time of implantation as determined by your eye doctor
  • Your vision is not stable as determined by your eye doctor

Before considering Visian ICL surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about Visian ICL surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks, and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery. For additional information with potential benefits, risks and complications please visit DiscoverICL.com

References

References

1Visian ICL Patient Information Booklet

2Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46.

3Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5Lee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

6Parkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

*American Refractive Surgery Council

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