The Contact Lens Truth

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The Huffington Post recently enlisted the help of two eye care professionals, optometrist Andrea Thau, OD and ophthalmologist Rebecca Taylor, MD to talk about the most common no-nos when using soft contact lens.

Here is their list of top 5 of "What YOU are doing” and "Why you should STOP!” bad habits that contact lens wearers have.

1. What you're doing:

You let tap water come into contact with your contact lenses.

Why you should stop: Seems harmless enough, right? Wrong. Tap water isn't salty like tears are, so contact lenses tend to absorb the water and swell. The contact lens will then "hold" it, which is a problem because water -- even water safe to drink -- isn't sterile and contains microorganisms. "If your lens swells, it changes how the lens fits on your eye and it will often make the lens tighten on the eye," Thau says. This can then create microscopic breaks in your cornea that micro-organisms can get into, potentially causing infection. That's why it's important not to shower or swim with your contact lenses in, she says (plus swimming in your contact lenses increases the chances of them coming out of your eye). In addition, you should never use water in place of solution for storing your contact lenses.

2. What you're doing:

Your contact lenses are bothering you but you don't have solution with you, so you use water or your own saliva as "emergency" solution to wash them before popping them back in your eye.

Why you should stop: Two words: bad idea. For the same explanation above, exposing your contact lenses to water isn't smart, and your saliva is ridden with bacteria that belong in your mouth and not your eye. Putting contacts in your mouth is "like putting them in a petri dish -- you just don't want to do that," Taylor says. If you do catch yourself in a situation where your contact lenses are bothering you but you don't have access to solution and a contact lens case, Thau says your best bet is to just throw them away. Another option is to use lubricating drops made for contact lens wearers (not the kinds to combat red eye) to try to relieve any discomfort. And of course, it's always wise to carry some emergency solution and a contact lens case with you at all times for moments like this.

3. What you're doing: You've been using the same contact lens case for as long as you can remember.

Why you should stop: First things first: Go to your bathroom and throw that old case away. Contact lens cases should only be used for three months tops before you replace with a new one.

4. What you're doing: You put your contact lenses in after putting your makeup on.

Why you should stop: Believe it or not, there is a correct order of application for people who wear both makeup and contacts. To avoid getting makeup on your contact lenses, Thau recommends putting contact lenses in your eyes before applying makeup, and then taking them out before removing eye makeup. On that same note, she also advises against putting creams or lotions on your hands before handling. "Your hands should be clean; put your lenses in first before you handle your lotions!"

5. What you're doing: You use waterproof makeup.

Why you should stop: Thau says beware of waterproof makeup! If the makeup gets on the lens, it will bind to it. And because waterproof makeup requires an oil-based remover, it will "grease up the eyes and the lenses.”

For more truths about contact lenses check out the article here

What is the Visian ICL?

From Glasses to Contacts to LASIK, the Visian ICL ushers in the next generation of vision technology. Many vision correction procedures promise an improved level of vision, but few can promise the level of quality found with the Visian ICL. It’s called High Definition Vision, its sharper, clearer, with greater depth and dimension, and it’s only available with the Visian ICL. The Visian ICL is the procedure of choice for patients who need and expect high quality results in performance and safety. When we asked patients to rate their experience with the Visian ICL, over 99% were satisfied with their results and 100% of US military personnel surveyed believe they function and perform better since they received the Visian ICL. When compared to other surgical vision correction procedures, the Visian ICL delivers sharper vision and high patient satisfaction. The Visian ICL is your clear choice for the best quality of vision.

For more information on the Visian ICL contact a certified doctor near you.

Important Safety Information

The Visian ICL is intended for the correction of moderate to high nearsightedness. Visian ICL and Visian TICL surgery is intended to safely and effectively correct nearsightedness between -3.0 D to -15.0 D, the reduction in nearsightedness up to -20.0 D and treatment of astigmatism from 1.0 D to 4.0 D. If you have nearsightedness within these ranges, Visian ICL surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Because the Visian ICL corrects for distance vision, it does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, you may require them at some point, even if you have never worn them before.

Implantation of the Visian ICL is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. Please discuss the risks with your eye care professional. Complications, although rare, may include need for additional surgical procedures, inflammation, loss of cells from the back surface of the cornea, increase in eye pressure, and cataracts.

You should NOT have Visian ICL surgery if:

  • Your doctor determines that the shape of your eye is not an appropriate fit for the Visian ICL
  • You are pregnant or nursing
  • You do not meet the minimum endothelial cell density for your age at the time of implantation as determined by your eye doctor
  • Your vision is not stable as determined by your eye doctor

Before considering Visian ICL surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about Visian ICL surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks, and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery. For additional information with potential benefits, risks and complications please visit DiscoverICL.com

References

References

1Visian ICL Patient Information Booklet

2Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46.

3Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5Lee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

6Parkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

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