Intro

Easy 20–30 Minute Procedure

A quick, painless same-day surgery to help you achieve better vision.

Pre-Op Eye Exam

Before you schedule your EVO Visian ICL (EVO) procedure your doctor will perform a series of standard tests to measure your eye’s unique characteristics for the procedure. Once your doctor determines that EVO ICL is a good option for you, they will educate you about the procedure and what to expect both during and after the procedure.

Getting Your EVO ICLs

When you arrive for your procedure your doctor will administer eye drops to dilate your pupils as well as anesthetize your eyes.

Small Opening

To prepare for the implant your doctor will create one small opening at the base of your cornea to insert the EVO ICL lens. The procedure is painless because of the numbing medication.

Lens Insertion & Positioning

The EVO ICL lens then can be folded and inserted through the small incision your doctor has made. Once the lens is inserted the doctor will make any necessary adjustments to ensure proper positioning in the eye.

Returning Home

At this point, the procedure is over and many patients will have improved vision nearly immediately. Your doctor will prescribe more eye drops intended to aid in the healing process following the procedure. You will need someone to drive you home, your doctor will tell you when your vision allows driving. See why the EVO ICL lens is worth the wait. Click here to watch the video.

Cost blocks

How much does the EVO ICL procedure cost? Is it more expensive than LASIK?

EVO ICL and LASIK costs vary depending on various factors that may include your prescription, location and provider. Upon consultation with an EVO ICL doctor, they will provide you with your specific cost, financing options and payment plans.

On average, contact lenses cost $12,000 over a lifetime.* Your personal cost will vary.

Because EVO ICL is a long term solution, your procedure costs are generally fixed to a one-time fee. When you compare with the long-term costs of contact lenses, EVO ICL typically pays for itself.

*Popular daily disposable contacts, on average, cost about $600 a year. So over 20 years, a patient will spend $12,000 on contact lenses.

Candidate desktop

Who is a Good Candidate for EVO ICL?

EVO ICL Candidates

  • Are between 21 and 45 years old.
  • Are nearsighted with mild to severe myopia (-3D to -20D).
  • Have not had a change in prescription of more than .5D in a year.
  • Are looking for a procedure that doesn’t cause dry eye syndrome.

Real Life Stories From Real Life Patients

The thing that I love about the Visian ICL is that they are putting a lens in there that can be removed.

Jennifer Puno, Web Designer

I feel like a big part of health is using what your body already has. Visian ICL is in line with that because it’s keeping your eye completely intact. My eye is still my eye.

Eve Torres Gracie, Jiu Jitsu Instructor

I would never be able to just wake up and go, and now I can literally just roll out of bed and go straight to the farmer's market.

Sara Tso, Chef

There’s a few big road blocks to having glasses and being a photographer. Now I’ve got Visian ICL and I can run out and live my life unhindered.

Andrew Oxenham, Photographer

I had my first opportunity to put my Visian ICL eyes to the test recently in the Amazon rainforest, and it couldn’t have been more exciting to be able to spot rare species better than ever.

Phil Torres, Entomologist, TV Show Host

2 Million+

Lenses Distributed

99.4%

Of patients would have the procedure again ¹

Ready to Discover Visual Freedom With EVO ICL? Find a Doctor Today

Important Safety Information

The EVO Visian ICL Lens is intended for the correction of moderate to high nearsightedness. EVO Visian ICL and EVO Visian TICL surgery is intended to safely and effectively correct nearsightedness between -3.0 D to -15.0 D, the reduction in nearsightedness up to -20.0 D and treatment of astigmatism from 1.0 D to 4.0 D. If you have nearsightedness within these ranges, EVO Visian ICL surgery may improve your distance vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Because the EVO Visian ICL corrects for distance vision, it does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, you may require them at some point, even if you have never worn them before.

Implantation of the EVO Visian ICL is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. Please discuss the risks with your eye care professional. Complications, although rare, may include need for additional surgical procedures, inflammation, loss of cells from the back surface of the cornea, increase in eye pressure, and cataracts.

You should NOT have EVO Visian ICL surgery if:

  • Your doctor determines that the shape of your eye is not an appropriate fit for the EVO Visian ICL
  • You are pregnant or nursing
  • You have moderate to severe damage to the optic nerve caused by increased pressure (glaucoma)
  • You do not meet the minimum endothelial cell density for your age at the time of implantation as determined by your eye doctor
  • Your vision is not stable as determined by your eye doctor

Before considering EVO Visian ICL surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about EVO Visian ICL surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks, and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery. For additional information with potential benefits, risks and complications please visit DiscoverICL.com

References

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References

1Patient Survey, STAAR Surgical ICL Data Registry, 2018

2Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46.

3Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5aLee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

5bParkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

*American Refractive Surgery Council